The knee joint

The knee is the largest joint in the human body and one of the most complex. It is really three joint rolled into one: a joint between the kneecap and the thigh bone (patellofemoral joint) and two joints between the thigh bone and the shin bone (the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints). It is designed to support a lot of force and provide stability but also a good range of motion. It is vulnerable to injuries and to arthritis. 

Four major ligaments provide stability and limit excessive movements of the knee: the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments. These can be injured individually or in combination with other structures.

The ends of the bone are protected by articular cartilage, a highly specialised structure which protects and cushions the bone. This can be damaged acutely, usually in a sporting injury, or can wear out to cause arthritis.

The ends of the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia) are also separated by two meniscii. A torn meniscus is a very commn knee injury.

Overuse can cause inflammation to tendons, known as tendonitis, fluid filled sacs, known as bursitis or can give iliotibial band syndrome. 

How to assess and treat knee conditions

All of the members of our team use the most modern equipment and are trained specialists. We are interested in making the correct diagnosis of your knee problem. We use MRI scanning for all of our patients with soft tissue injuries and the scans are reported by musculoskeletal specialist radiologists.  When surgery is required, we have access to advanced techiques which are not available in all centres, such as cartilage cell transplantation and customised implants. Physiotherapy can be arranged at the base hospitals or other facilities with which Mr. Miles has contacts who deal with athletes, professional dancers and complex arthroplasty patients.