Meniscus of the knee

This is one of the most common groups of knee problems. They can occur as a direct result of an injury, either sporting or not and are most common when the knee is twisted. In some cases there are no obvious signs of an injury and the damage may be secondary to degeneration of the meniscus or cartilage. If this is the case there may be a torn meniscus and arthritis present in the knee at the same time.

This is a picture taken during an arthroscopy (keyhole knee operation) It shows Mr Miles using a small metal hook probe to demonstrate a horizontal tear of the meniscus. In this case the lower portion of the meniscus was removed over the torn section, leaving behind around 85% of the rest of the meniscus to continue its shock absorbing function. The operation was perfomed as a day case procedure and the gentleman was back at work two weeks after surgery and back to sports six weeks later. In some cases, the meniscus is better repaired. Mr Miles uses modern techniques to do this arthroscopically and just through two small incisions at the front of the knee (the all inside technique) which minimises the trauma to the knee.